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Events in August

Thanks, Maggie & Newstead Youth Centre Portraits

Thursday 27 June - 7 Jul 19

Thanks, Maggie
&
Newstead Youth Centre Portraits
Photographs by David Severn


9 February to 7 July 2019

Most visitors to Newstead Abbey are unaware that outside of the perimeter wall lies a former colliery, and a community that occupy rows of former miners’ houses.  In a new exhibition at Newstead Abbey, Nottingham-based photographer David Severn presents a lesser-known view of Newstead and Nottinghamshire.  Through his earnest and sensitively observed photographs and portraits, David shows his interest in two parallel worlds which are situated beside each other, where an ancient priory wall acts as a dividing line between two contrasting but equally significant tales of Nottinghamshire’s history.

 

Since Newstead Colliery closed in 1987, now replaced by a sprawling country park, the loss of the pit has left a lasting legacy upon the residents. Despite this, the younger generation show a deep affection towards Newstead Village. Guided by the young people themselves, Newstead Youth Centre Portraits lead us through the local streets and play areas. This is their Newstead, their turf, and they are proud of it.

 

Further afield across Nottinghamshire, other pit closures left many open wounds for the former the coal miners and their families.  In Thanks, Maggie, David Severn explores these abandoned coalfields to observe the communities left behind, and discover how some traditions still remain in the social clubs that his own pit-working father and grandfather may have frequented. Vivid echoes of the collieries remain, as does the bitter lament of the Miner’s Strike of 1984-85 that runs through the stories, music and veins of contemporary life.

 

This exhibition is free, but normal entry charges apply to the house. 
Please check our opening times for visitor information.

 

Newstead Youth Centre Portraits was originally commissioned by LandLiesFallow, an artist-led community project supported by the National Lottery Heritage Fund, as part of a creative response to the communities along the ancient borders of Sherwood Forest.

 

An evening with Ian Hislop and Tom Huckenhall

Thursday 25 July - 25 Jul 19

£15.00 including refreshments and canapes

Newstead Abbey is excited to host an intimate evening with TV personality, writer and journalist Ian Hislop, and British Museum Curator Tom Huckenhull.

Ahead of the official launch of an exclusive British Museum spotlight loan exhibition this Summer at Newstead Abbey, The golden age of satire? Late-Georgian satirical prints, Ian Hislop will give an illustrated and private insight to the exhibition at a special evening of discussion.

Ian Hislop is no stranger to satire, having carved a successful career as editor of Private Eye magazine, panellist on Have I Got News For You and as curator of the recent British Museum exhibition I Object: Ian Hislop’s search for dissent. In conversation with Tom Hockenhull, his British Museum co-curator, Ian will discuss some of his favourite objects from the exhibition, not least British satirical prints by Gillray and Cruikshank, among others, which go on display at Newstead Abbey. Rude, crude and very funny, these works were at the cutting edge of eighteenth-century satire, shaping contemporary views of the Georgian monarchy. Laughter, it transpires, really is the best medicine, ruthlessly exposing society’s injustices and holding a mirror to the worst excesses of its ruling elite.

 

Tickets are on sale for £15, which includes drinks and canapés, and an exclusive private preview of the exhibition before it opens.

Thursday 25th July 2019, 7-9pm
The Orangery, Newstead Abbey.
(prompt 7.30pm start for a 45mins talk).

A BSL signed interpreter will be present 

*Please note.  There is limited wheelchair access within Newstead Abbey, please see our website for access information*

 

About the exhibition:

A British Museum Spotlight Loan
The golden age of satire?
Late-Georgian satirical prints
Newstead Abbey, Nottingham 27 July – 6 October 2019

Generously supported by the Dorset Foundation


The first modern political cartoons were invented in Britain in the second half of the eighteenth century, a period often referred to as the ’golden age’ of satire. Through wit and grotesque exaggeration, a small group of talented printmakers ruthlessly exposed the flaws of the rich and powerful.

The Georgian monarchy was a popular target for satire. Printmakers frequently mocked King George III, portraying him as a buffoon, and attacked his sons for their decadent and self-indulgent lifestyles. Aware of the potential dangers of unchecked criticism, the government kept a watchful eye on the industry and moved to suppress prints and publishers it considered dangerously subversive.

The golden age of satire? Late-Georgian satirical prints will be displayed in the beautiful settings of the King Charles II rooms at Newstead Abbey, alongside Nottingham Museums own collection of satirical objects, including Lord Byron’s own scathing (often hilarious) letters, all selected in response to the themes of the British Museum spotlight exhibition.

 

 

A special, one-off evening with Ian Hislop and Tom Hockenhull

Thursday 25 July - 25 Jul 19

£15.00 (includes drinks and canapés)

Newstead Abbey is excited to host an intiockenhull.

Ahead of the official launch of an exclusive British Museum spotlight loan exhibition this Summer at Newstead Abbey, The golden age of satire? Late-Georgian satirical prints, Ian Hislop will give an illustrated and private insight to the exhibition at a special evening of discussion.

Ian Hislop is no stranger to satire, having carved a successful career as editor of Private Eye magazine, panellist on Have I Got News For You and as curator of the recent British Museum exhibition I Object: Ian Hislop’s search for dissent. In conversation with Tom Hockenhull, his British Museum co-curator, Ian will discuss some of his favourite objects from the exhibition, not least British satirical prints by Gillray and Cruikshank, among others, which go on display at Newstead Abbey. Rude, crude and very funny, these works were at the cutting edge of eighteenth-century satire, shaping contemporary views of the Georgian monarchy. Laughter, it transpires, really is the best medicine, ruthlessly exposing society’s injustices and holding a mirror to the worst excesses of its ruling elite.

 

Tickets are on sale for £15, which includes drinks and canapés, and an exclusive private preview of the exhibition before it opens.

Thursday 25th July 2019, 7-9pm
The Orangery, Newstead Abbey.
(prompt 7.30pm start for a 45mins talk).

A BSL signed interpreter will be present 

*Please note.  There is limited wheelchair access within Newstead Abbey, please see our website for access information*

 

About the exhibition:

A British Museum Spotlight Loan
The golden age of satire?
Late-Georgian satirical prints
Newstead Abbey, Nottingham 27 July – 6 October 2019

Generously supported by the Dorset Foundation


The first modern political cartoons were invented in Britain in the second half of the eighteenth century, a period often referred to as the ’golden age’ of satire. Through wit and grotesque exaggeration, a small group of talented printmakers ruthlessly exposed the flaws of the rich and powerful.

The Georgian monarchy was a popular target for satire. Printmakers frequently mocked King George III, portraying him as a buffoon, and attacked his sons for their decadent and self-indulgent lifestyles. Aware of the potential dangers of unchecked criticism, the government kept a watchful eye on the industry and moved to suppress prints and publishers it considered dangerously subversive.

The golden age of satire? Late-Georgian satirical prints will be displayed in the beautiful settings of the King Charles II rooms at Newstead Abbey, alongside Nottingham Museums own collection of satirical objects, including Lord Byron’s own scathing (often hilarious) letters, all selected in response to the themes of the British Museum spotlight exhibition.

 

 

Events in August